Plant Paradox Diet Full Shopping List & FAQs

by | Nov 27, 2018

Plant Paradox Shopping List

Lectin-Free Foods to Eat and Avoid on Dr. Gundry’s Diet

So you’re ready to go lectin0free? You’re going to want the full shopping list for the Plant Paradox diet, including Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program.

Further below is the full list of lectin free foods approved for by Dr. Gundry, as well as the Plant Paradox food pyramid. The good news is that, although you will have to cut some things out in order to keep your diet lectin-free, he does allow plenty of delicious foods. If you’re looking for a list of what not to eat, jump to lectin-rich foods to avoid.

When you’re ready to start, make your life easier with my interactive guide to Plant Paradox meals and recipes. It includes breakfasts, lunches, dinners, deserts and snacks, as well as the popular Plant Paradox 3-Day Cleanse.

If you’re new to the diet and have questions, see the FAQ section at the bottom of the page.

I recommend that you bookmark this page on your phone for easy access when you’re at the grocery store or out to eat (it makes it into an app on your home screen).

Plant Paradox Shopping List

Dr. Gundry recommends consuming a wide but select variety of vegetables, wild-caught seafood, nuts, fats, oils and A2 milk dairy products. Pasture-raised meats and poultry, and some fruits, are allowed in moderation.

Here’s the full Plant Paradox “yes” list.

Lectin-Free Foods

Oils and Fats

  • Algae oil
  • Olive oil (see my favorite)
  • Grass-fed ghee (see why I love it)
  • Coconut oil
  • Macadamia oil
  • MCT oil
  • Avocado oil
  • Avocado oil mayo
  • Perilla oil
  • Walnut oil
  • Red palm oil
  • Rice bran oil
  • Sesame oil
  • Flavored cod liver oil

Learn more about healthy fats and oils for the Plant Paradox Diet.

Protein Bars

  • Quest Bars (select flavors)
  • B-up Bars (select flavors)
  • Adapt Bars (select flavors)

I’m not a fan of Quest, B-Up or Adapt Bars — they’re neither healthy nor appetizing. I did some research and found some other great lectin-free options:

  • MariGold bars (#1 rated, read my review) 
  • Pottentia bars (select flavors)
  • Thunderbird bars (select flavors)
  • Larabars (select flavors)

Read my in-depth write up to see which flavors of each brand are lectin-free, or watch the video review below.

I highly recommend starting with MariGold Bars’ lectin-free sampler pack. Get $10 off with promo code HFB10.

Fruit

  • Avocado
  • All berries in season (berries are natural lectin blockers)
  • Kiwis

Resistant Starches

These are great for your microbiome, but eat them in moderation.

  • Siete brand tortillas
  • Bread and bagels made by Julian Bakery
  • Paleo Wraps made with coconut flour
  • Paleo coconut cakes
  • Green plantains
  • Green bananas
  • Baobab fruit
  • Cassava
  • Sweet potatoes or yams
  • Rutabaga
  • Parsnips
  • Yucca
  •  Celery root
  • Glucomannan
  • Persimmon
  • Jicama
  • Taro roots
  • Turnips
  • Tiger nuts
  • Green mango
  • Millet Sorghum
  • Green papaya

Veggies

  • Cruciferous
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Cauli ower
  • Bok choy
  • Napa cabbage
  • Chinese cabbage
  • Swiss chard
  • Arugula
  • Watercress
  • Collards
  • Kale
  • Green and Red cabbage Radicchio
  • Raw sauerkraut Kimchi
  • Nopales cactus
  • Celery
  • Onions
  • Leeks
  • Chives
  • Scallions
  • Chicory (learn about inulin prebiotic fiber)
  • Carrots
  • Carrot greens
  • Artichokes
  • Beets
  • Radishes
  • Daikon radishes
  • Jerusalem artichokes
  • Hearts of palm Cilantro
  • Okra (lectin blocker)
  • Asparagus
  • Garlic
  • Leafy greens
  • Romaine
  • Red and green leaf lettuce Kohlrabi
  • Mesclun
  • Spinac
  • Endive
  • Dandelion greens
  • Butter lettuce
  • Fennel
  • Escarole
  • Mustard greens
  • Mizuna
  • Parsley
  • Basil
  • Mint
  • Purslane
  • Perilla
  • Algae
  • Seaweed
  • Sea vegetables (Bladderwrack is a lectin blocker)
  • Mushrooms

Sweeteners

  • Stevia
  • Inulin
  • Yacon
  • Monkfruit
  • Erythritol
  • Xylitol

Learn more about healthy sweeteners for the lectin-free diet.

Nuts and Seeds

  • (1⁄2 cup/day) Macadamia, Walnuts, Pecans, Pistachios, Pine nuts
  • Pecans (see my favorite healthy praline pecans)
  • Coconut
  • Coconut Cream Hazelnuts
  • Chestnuts
  • Flaxseeds
  • Hemp seeds
  • Sesame Seeds
  • Hemp protein powder
  • Psyllium
  • Pine nuts
  • Brazil nuts

Fish

  • Any wild caught 2 – 4 oz per day
  • White fish
  • Freshwater bass
  • Alaskan salmon
  • Canned tuna
  • Alaskan halibut
  • Hawaiian fish
  • Shrimp
  •  Crab
  • Lobster
  • Scallops
  • Calamari/squid• Oysters
  •  Mussel
  • Sardines
  • Anchovies
  • Crustacean shells are a natural lectin blocker

Olives

All

Dark Chocolate

  • 72% or greater

Vinegars

  • ALL without added sugar

Flours

  • Coconut
  • Almond
  • Hazelnut
  • Sesame

Ice Cream

  • Coconut
  • Milk/Dairy Free frozen dessert with 1 gram of sugar

Dairy Products

  • A2 Milk
  • 1 oz. cheese or 4 oz. yogurt per day
  • French/Italian butter
  • Ghee
  • Goat butter
  • Goat cheese
  • Butter (grass fed French or Italian)
  • Goat brie
  • Goat and sheep brie
  • Sheep cheese (plain)
  • Coconut yogurt
  • High-fat French/Italian cheeses such as triple-cream brie
  • High-fat Switzerland cheese
  • Buffalo mozzarella (made from buffalo milk)
  • Organic heavy cream
  • Organic sour cream
  • Organic cream cheese (high fat dairy doesn’t have casein)
  • Lectin-free whey protein 

Vinegars

  • ALL without added sugars

Herbs and Seasoning

  • ALL (except chili pepper flakes)
  • Miso

Wine and Spirits

  • Champagne (one 6 oz glass per day
  • Red (one 6 oz glass per day)• Aged spirits (1 oz.)

Pasture-raised poultry

  • 2-4oz per day (avoid farm-raised)
  • Chicken
  • Chicken broth (read about my favorite)
  • Turkey
  • Ostrich
  • Pastured or omega 3 eggs
  • 4 yolks daily or 1 egg white
  • Duck
  • Goose
  • Quail
  • Dove Grouse

Plant Based Meats poultry

  • Quorn
  • Hemp tofu
  • Hilary’s root
  • Veggie burger
  • Tempeh (grain free only)

Meat

The Plant Paradox Food Pyramid 

Dr. Gundry has put together a food pyramid for the Plant Paradox diet. This lectin free foods chart provides a great snapshot of what you should be eating, and how much. 

Avoiding Lectin-Rich Foods.

Stear clear of refined, starchy foods, grains, dairy products that do not come from A2 cow milk, nightshades, legumes and select nuts, oils and other fats. The complete list of lectin foods to avoid follows below.

Refined, starchy foods

  • Pasta Rice
  • Potatoes
  • Potato chips
  • Milk
  • Bread
  • Tortillas
  • Pastries
  • Flour
  • Crackers
  • Cookies
  • Cereal

Dairy

  • Non-Southern European Cow’s Milk Products (these contain casein A-1)
  • Yogurt (including Greek yogurt)
  • Ice cream
  • Frozen yogurt
  • Cheese Ricotta
  • Cottage cheese

Sweeteners

  • Sugar
  • Agave
  • Sweet One or Sunett (Acesulfame K)
  • Splenda (Sucralose)
  • NutraSweet (Aspartame)
  • Sweet’n Low (Saccharin)
  • Diet drinks
  • Maltodextrin

Vegetables and legumes

  • Peas
  • Sugar snap peas
  • Legumes*
  • Green beans
  • Chickpeas* (including hummus)
  • Soy
  • Tofu
  • Edamame
  • Soy protein
  • Textured vegetable protein [TVP]
  • Pea protein
  • All beans, including sprouts All lentils

*Vegans and vegetarians can have these legumes in Phase 2. but only if they are properly prepared in a pressure cooker.

Fruits (some called vegetables)

  • Cucumbers
  • Zucchini
  • Pumpkins
  • Squashes (any kind)
  • Melons (any kind)
  • Eggplant
  • Tomatoes
  • Bell peppers
  • Chili peppers
  • Goji berries

Nuts and Seeds

  • Sunflower
  • Chia
  • Peanuts
  • Cashews

Grains

  • Kefir Grains
  • Sprouted Grains
  • Pseudo-Grains,and Grasses
  • Wheat (pressure cooking does not remove lectins from any form of wheat)
  • Einkorn wheat
  • Kamut
  • Oats (cannot pressure cook)
  • Quinoa Rye (cannot pressure cook)
  • Bulgur White rice
  • Brown rice
  • Wild rice
  • Barley (cannot pressure cook)
  • Buckwheat
  • Kashi
  • Spelt
  • Corn
  • Corn products
  • Cornstarch
  • Corn syrup
  • Popcorn
  • Wheatgrass
  • Barley grass

Oils

  • Soy
  • Grape seed
  • Corn
  • Peanut
  • Cottonseed
  • Safflower
  • Sunflower
  • “Partially hydrogenated” Vegetable
  • Canola

Dr Gundry’s Plant Paradox Diet FAQs

Lectin-free Diet vs. Plant Paradox Diet – What’s the Difference?

While avoiding lectins is central to the Plant Paradox regime, there is much, much more to Dr. Gundry’s wildly popular diet than that. The main difference is that whereas the lectin-free diet simply has you avoiding foods that contain lectins, he goes a step further and prescribes healthy foods, including:

  • Consuming copious amounts of diverse prebiotic fiber and resistant starch. Doing so is excellent for your microbiome as it increases microbial diversity, which is strongly correlated to good health. This could account for the benefits of the Plant Paradox Diet just as much as avoiding the harmful effects of lectins.
  • Keep sugar intake very low, including limiting consumption of fruit, especially if it’s out of season.
  • Consume animal products in moderation, with the exception of seafood.
  • Your food should be organic and locally sourced as much as possible.

What Are Lectins and Why Are They a Problem?

Lectins are microscopic proteins that plants evolved to defend themselves from predators, including insects and animals (that includes humans!). They are essentially indigestible and have the unique ability to increase the permeability of your intestines.

That means that they can pass through the wall of your gut, and will and be treated as foreign invaders by your immune system. This causes an inflammatory response, which can set the stage for a host of diseases, as well as weight gain. 

For a deep dive into lectins, see Dr. Gundry’s guide

What Foods Are Rich In Lectins?

Generally speaking, all grains and legumes have more lectins than anything else. In some cases, pressure cooking can destroy the lectins. Nightshade vegetables, squashes, and select nuts and seeds are also rich in lectins. A full list of lectin-containing foods is included further above

How Long Does Dr. Gundry’s Diet Last?

The Plant Paradox Diet starts with an optional 3-day cleanse (don’t worry, you still get to eat!). After that, there’s Phase 1, a 14 day period where your diet is somewhat limited, but you still get to eat a lot of delicious food. Depending on the results you’re getting, Phase 1 may last longer than 14 days.

During Phase 2, which lasts an additional 6 weeks, you’ll significantly expand what you can eat but will still be avoiding all foods with lectins.

After that, depending on how you feel, you can consider slowly reintroducing foods that contain lectins, in moderation. However, some people feel so great that they have no interest in doing so. Others won’t be able to without having symptom flareups. 

What Can I Eat During the Plant Paradox 3-Day Cleanse?

The Plant Paradox 3-Day Cleanse is relatively easy by cleansing standards, as you don’t have to fast and there are some great meals included. Consume plenty of healthy fats to avoid getting hungry. Here’s what you can eat on Day 1. All the other days and recipes can be found here.

DAY 1

BREAKFAST: Green Smoothie
SNACK: Romaine Lettuce Boats Filled with Guacamole
LUNCH: Arugula Salad with Chicken and Lemon Vinaigrette
SNACK: Romaine Lettuce Boats Filled with Guacamole
DINNER: Cabbage-Kale Saute with Salmon and Avocado

What’s a Typical Lectin-free Menu Like During the 14 Days?

Here’s Day 1 of Dr. Gundry’s diet. See the the full 14-day menu and all recipes here

DAY 1

BREAKFAST: Green Smoothie
SNACK: 1/4 cup raw nuts
LUNCH: Pastured chicken breast and cabbage slaw wrapped in lettuce leaves with sliced avocado*
SNACK: Romaine Lettuce Boats Filled with Guacamole
DINNER: Spinach Pizza with a Cauliflower Crust; mixed green salad with avocado vinaigrette dressing

What Is Prebiotic Fiber and Why Does Dr. Gundry Recommend It?

Prebiotic fiber such as inulin is naturally occurring fiber in foods that cannot be entirely digested by your body. Instead, it’s digested by microbes, and as such it feeds your microbiome.

The more variety of prebiotic fiber you consume – and there’s a lot out there – the better! Diversity on the plate results in diversity in the gut, and microbial diversity is strongly correlated to good health. Eat as many veggies as possible, save for the ones that have lectins of course, like nightshades and squash. 

Are People Getting Results?

Yes. In addition to the tens of thousands for people who swear by the Plant Paradox Diet, Dr. Gundry has had hundreds of his patients go on his program, has tracked their results, and has published and presented his findings. People are losing weight and overcoming a variety of diseases, from the minor to the serious. You can see his research here

Is the Plant Paradox Diet Good for Weight Loss?

Absolutely. Here’s why:

    • Lectins can cause inflammation, which is associated with weight gain. Removing them can reverse this.
    • A more diverse microbiome is also associated with a healthy weight, and few diets are better for your microbiome than the Plant Paradox program.
    • Finally, in avoiding refined, processed foods, including grains and starches you will inevitably reduce your carb intake.

Did Kelly Clarkson Really Lose 37 Pounds?

Yes, Kelly Clarkson was very successful on the Plant Paradox Diet. Remarkably, she wasn’t even trying to lose weight – she was on the diet to improve her overall health (which she also did). You can read her story here.

Is Dr. Gundry’s Diet Controversial?

Yes, as is often the case when someone is having great success, Dr. Gundry has his critics. However, for every critic, he has tens of thousands of fans. I’ve read some of the attempts to debunk the Plant Paradox Diet and it’s clear no one has read the full book, let alone actually been on the diet! 

Bottom line: A LOT of people feel great (and lose weight!) on the diet. It’s wildly popular for good reason. Try it for yourself and see how you feel!

Bookmark this list on your phone

You can bookmark this page and add it to your phone’s home screen for easy access when you’re out shopping. Here’s how to do it for iPhone and iPad:

  1. Tap the middle icon at the bottom of the screen (square with arrow)
  2. In the popup, scroll to the right and tap on Add to Home Screen
  3. Find the Human Food Bar logo on your phone

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